Haute route sept 2013

Haute route sept 2013

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Posts: 11. This thread is closed.
jackdebear
jackdebear
45 posts
active member
Jul 27, 2013 - 10:04 AM
Seems to be less info as to the route/routes, on line. Same for accommodation. I've done the Via Alpina. Did not carry a sleeping bag and had no problems. I'm wondering if I can get away without on on the Haute Route. Looks like there will be some 'refuges'. I'm not clear about the bedding ordeal. Any info at all would be welcome.
Annika
Annika
4417 posts
expert &
moderator
Jul 29, 2013 - 1:53 PM
Hi jackdebear. You're right, details about the Haute Route are quite hard to find online. In general, I can say that the first two weeks of September would be better than the latter two, as some mountain huts already close down in the course of September. It can be busy, so you should make reservations for huts and cabins. The SAC website is a good starting point. Furthermore, you may like this information. And if you need to prepare thoroughly, this book may be of better help than any online info.

In any case, make sure you're in good shape and experienced enough to undertake this demanding tour. If you're not absolutely sure of your own capabilities, consider a group tour or hire a quide for your own safety.
jackdebear
jackdebear
45 posts
active member
Jul 30, 2013 - 9:08 AM
I'll be at the trail head Sept 5th. I'm not expecting to be lost or alone in the mountains. Accidents can happen anywhere but I have found that people tend to watch out for each other in places like this. With well marked trails, a cell phone, and a willingness to give up if circumstances warrant I don't think there is much to worry about. My experience has been that people generally exaggerate the difficulty of hikes. Thanks for the motherly advice.

I've just gotten a reply from the SAC saying - "You don’t need a sleeping bag. But you need for hygienic reason a silk- or cotton liner."

The SAC KMZ file is a terrific resource but the locations often turn into dead ends. Place names with no information that I can chase down anywhere on line.

I have found 3 or 4 useful sites. This is the best I've found - http://home.earthlink.net/~ellozy/haute-route/general-information.html. Great route maps.
Annika
Annika
4417 posts
expert &
moderator
Jul 31, 2013 - 5:53 AM
Thanks for sharing your info! There are more hikers looking for details on the Haute Route, so the SAC answer and the link you provided are very helpful. Have fun preparing for your trip!
jackdebear
jackdebear
45 posts
active member
Aug 1, 2013 - 10:41 PM
I'm pleased to be helpful. And I really do appreciate your advice. Here I am nowhere near the trail and already someone it trying to help me stay out of trouble.

This is another very good site: http://www.via-alpina.org/en/page/15/the-trails Nothing really to do with the Haute Route except that I may leave the HR around Gruben and try sections R98 to R100 as a shortcut back to the Via Alpina. (Heading back to Schynige Platte. The closest I've been to paradise.) Appreciate any advice or info.

Empty what is full.
Fill what is empty.
Scratch where it itches.
Annika
Annika
4417 posts
expert &
moderator
Aug 6, 2013 - 3:51 AM
Hi jackdebear. I can perfectly understand you'll be heading back for the Jungfrau region: it's indeed stunning. As for the Via Alpina, I'd recommend the official Wanderland website. It provides great details on such national routes, including height profiles, overnight options, and so on. A slightly different variant from the one you've linked to is described here though.

Now, as for crossing over from the Haute Route to the Via Alpina: I don't know your preferences and options in terms of the duration of your stay, budget, physical fitness, etcetera. But leaving the Haute Route near Gruben means that you're missing out on the last section(s) of the Haute Route where you actually enter the Matter valley. In my opinion, the last part to St. Niklaus/Zermatt would actually be a highlight. If you can, you should actually finish the route into the Matter valley if you haven't been there before yet, or at least plan a visit to Zermatt by train once you're there. Next, you can travel to Gampel/Steg or Leukerbad by public transportation and pick up the Via Alpina there.

Of course you can also leave at Gruben. Simply hike down to the Rhone valley in the direction of Gampel/Steg and move on to the Via Alpina.
jackdebear
jackdebear
45 posts
active member
Aug 7, 2013 - 7:34 AM
-I've been to Zermatt. (Horrible horrible tourist ghetto. Oiy! Just an opinion folks.) In and out by train before so I guess I didn't get the best views or impression of the neighbourhood. I'll look at my plan to skip it in light of your input. Shame to hike down that valley just to get the first train out. But, Oiy!

-I plan to hike for 6 or 7 weeks. Maybe leave the Via Alpina at Grindelwald, take a train back to Sargans and continue through Liechtenstein and into Austria and Slovenia if the weather favours. I'm not concerned with budget or physical ability. Some angst about how well some trails may be marked. The biggest part of my preparations seems to be sorting out accommodation. What's open, what's not. What's cheap, what's not.

-Considering the route from Kiental to Lobhornhütte. http://www.wandermap.net/en/route/1826759-lobhornhutte-kiental/#/z14/46.59322,7.79055/mapquest Once again info and advice svp.

Empty what is full.
Fill what is empty.
Scratch where it itches.
jackdebear
jackdebear
45 posts
active member
Aug 9, 2013 - 11:09 AM
I've finished 'The Book' since my last post. I'll quote the part about the hike from St Niklaus to Zermatt: " - this valley walk will still be the preferred choice for those with limited time or as a bad weather alternative. It is something of a tease, for naturally the Matterhorn is what you hope to see, but it remains hidden until the very end. The walk, it must be said, is by no means the most scenic of the HR for it never strays far from the road or railway, and views are necessarily limited by the steep valley walls. However, it is not uninteresting as you might fear, for there are hamlets and villages along the way, as well as hay barns, meadows and forests - and the river. --- Sadly the entry into Zermatt by this route is an anti-climax, as the northern end of town seems to be a permanent construction site."
Hmmm…. He also has some impressions of Zermatt itself which wouldn't draw me there personally. All lines up pretty well with what I recall. Hard to imagine anyone saying, "In my opinion, the last part to St. Niklaus/Zermatt would actually be a highlight.", unless you did the Europaweg. ? Anyway, different strokes for different folks. I'd bypass Chamonix too if the bus from Geneva wasn't so convenient.
It sounds worth the time to go as far as St Niklaus. I will consider the Europaweg up to the point it becomes dangerous if there is any point in it. I expect current conditions will best be sought closer to that point on the trail.

Empty what is full.
Fill what is empty.
Scratch where it itches.
Annika
Annika
4417 posts
expert &
moderator
Aug 12, 2013 - 6:46 AM
Hi jackdebear. Yes, Zermatt is touristy, but the Matter valley and particularly the part south of Zermatt is beautiful. But if you've been there before or feel like this part of the route doesn't appeal to you, you can simply skip the last part.

As for finding your way: I can't tell much about Liechtenstein, Austria and Slovenia, but generally (alpine) hiking routes in Switzerland are very well marked. In case of well-known national or international hiking routes, I'd expect good signs in other countries too.

The trail Kiental-Lobhornhütte is not part of the Via Alpina. You can use it as an entrance to the Via Alpina though. You could travel from the Rhone valley to Kandersteg, Frutigen and Reichenbach and hike from the Kiental to the Lobhornhütte. From there, you could get back southward to Griesalp and pick up the Via Alpina here (Griesalp-Lauterbrunnen), or descend directly from the Lobhornhütte to Lauterbrunnen. A direct hike from Kiental to Griesalp would be an option too. The Wanderland map allows you to search for marked trails between all points. I suggest you contact Kiental or Kandersteg Tourism for further detals.
jackdebear
jackdebear
45 posts
active member
Aug 24, 2013 - 8:40 AM
I expect the hillsides south east of Z should have great views. Somewhere in my reading I got the impression the Europaweg is effectively impassable. The Cicerone update from Kev is so dire I didn't bother to read the last chapter of the book. (I'm surprised no one has had anything to say about the Europaweg. Not a lot of long distance hikers in the membership it would seem.) More reading tells me it's mostly a mater of how able, determined, lucky, or stupid one is. (Dumb luck is my particular ace in the hole.) Langsam, langsam. I may get to Z again after all. My little heart just skips a beat.
(Aside; any photographers out there should look into the 'Photographer's Ephemeris'. Free software that tells you exactly when and where the sun and moon will appear.)

Empty what is full.
Fill what is empty.
Scratch where it itches.
Arno
Arno
7722 posts
expert &
moderator
Aug 24, 2013 - 11:23 AM
Hi there,
Well, the Europaweg is open, but there's still the long detour due to the closed bridge. More information is on zermatt.ch. The valley trail is the quicker alternative, and the bad weather alternative. That may leave time to visit your beloved Zermatt ;-) Thanks for mentioning the TPE app. That is really interesting for serious photographers. Good light is crucial for a good shot, and the one thing one can't control, but the app helps.

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