Interlaken to Jungfraujoch

Interlaken to Jungfraujoch

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Removed user
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Apr 13, 2015 - 4:26 PM

Hi Annika,

I am Shweta Joshi and I had emailed you my queries on travel to Jungfraujoch from Interlaken in May this year. Thank you for replying to my email.I have a few queries as below:

1. If i go for a Swiss Travel Pass for 3 days which costs around 210 CHF per person i get a 25% discount on travel to Jungfraujoch from Wengen which comes to around 133 CHF. I thought it was still costly. I mean we would be using the Swiss Travel Card only the Interlaken-Jungfrau region and still paying for the trip to Jungfraujoch. Can you recommend me more options? Our train tickets from Paris to Interlaken and back are done.

2. We want to do a cable car ride in Switzerland. Can you suggest a scenic one in the Interlaken-Junfrau region as we will be based in Interlaken and prefer doing day trips? We will be Interlaken from 30th April night to 3rd may afternoon.

Will wait to hear from you :)

Regards,

Shweta

Slowpoke
Slowpoke
2656 posts
expert
Apr 14, 2015 - 6:56 AM in reply to Removed user

shwetasj07 said: <<"2. We want to do a cable car ride in Switzerland...........We will be Interlaken from 30th April night to 3rd may afternoon. ">>

Many lifts/cable cars are closed for service on varying days during that time of year. It is after the ski season and before the summer hiking /tourist season.

According to my time table book, one which is open at that time is the set of lifts from Stechelberg up to Schilthorn. Or, you may pick it up in Mürren, or a couple of other stops. It is surely very scenic. And, the Schilthorn is the location where one James Bond movie was shot.

I just checked the SBB timetable on line, and it confirms availability after April 24th.

The nice ride from Wengen to Männlichen is not open on your dates.

Perhaps Arno can suggest other ones in the Interlaken/Jungfrau locality.

The one from Meiringen up to Hasliberg-Reuti seems to be open until May 3. That is not quite where you requested, but Meiringen is accessible easily by train from Interlaken. The stages going further up beyond Hasliberg-Reuti to the Alpen tower seem to be closed, after 6 April until 30 May, however. It is a multi-stage journey, and quite scenic. It is too bad that only the lowest stage is open. on your dates.

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Apr 14, 2015 - 8:23 AM

Hey Slowpoke,

Thanks a lot for your reply. Should I check the SBB site for the cable car rides availability on our dates? can you please share the link? Also, do we need to book the ride online or we can do it from Interlaken? Please let me know.

Regards,

Shweta

Annika
Annika
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Apr 14, 2015 - 11:01 AM

Hi Shweta,

All public transport including cable cars can be found in the SBB timetable. Also most of our 'attraction' pages like this one about Mount Niesen, have links to timetables for that specific cable car or train. Niederhorn is another one you might be interested in.

A ride to Jungfraujoch from Wengen costs CHF 127.50 if you own a Swiss Travel Pass. You can also look into the Swiss Half Fare Card, or the Regional-Pass Bernese Oberland. If you want to do a detailed calculation to see what works out cheapest with your plans, then first finalize your plans and then follow these instructions. Note that Jungfraujoch is the most expensive one in Switzerland. Others are cheaper. Not cheap, but cheaper :-)

I hope this was useful!

Last modified on Apr 14, 2015 - 11:02 AM by Annika
Slowpoke
Slowpoke
2656 posts
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Apr 14, 2015 - 3:32 PM in reply to Annika

Annika-

Thanks for jumping in.

I find that using the SBB web site for cable car time tables works very well, but occasionally needs careful selection of the location names. In theory, it should not matter, and, in normal practice, it rarely does, but sometimes it helps to spot the abbreviation "LSB" beside a name. LSB stands for LuftSeilBahn, which translates roughly as "air cable train." Or, you may see the word Luftseilbahn or Seilbahn in the list of name choices after you enter the town or station stop name.

Fognorth
Fognorth
29 posts
active member
Apr 14, 2015 - 4:03 PM in reply to Slowpoke

Annika said:

A ride to Jungfraujoch from Wengen costs CHF 127.50 if you own a Swiss Travel Pass. You can also look into the Swiss Half Fare Card,

Whoa.... ! ! CHF and USD are close to parity right? So approx $127 USD? which is half off with the Swiss Travel Card. REALLY! Maybe I can't afford Switzerland...Wow.

Slowpoke
Slowpoke
2656 posts
expert
Apr 14, 2015 - 4:14 PM in reply to Fognorth

<< Annika said: A ride to Jungfraujoch from Wengen costs CHF 127.50 if you own a Swiss Travel Pass. You can also look into the Swiss Half Fare Card,Whoa.... ! ! CHF and USD are close to parity right? So approx $127 USD? which is half off with the Swiss Travel Card. REALLY! Maybe I can't afford Switzerland...Wow. ">>

Not so long ago it took a lot more dollars to buy a Swiss Frank, and that rail line had plenty of customers from countries with a hard currency. ;-(

Specialty pricing, which is charging for perceived value, is some times called "charge what the market will bear."

To each his own. My first visit to Switzerland was in 1980, I've been there over 50 times, and I've never gone up there. I'd go up on the Brienzer Rothorn first.

I did ride up as far as Eigergletscher and walked the Eiger Trail at the base of the North Face and down to to Alpiglen. I'd do that again, as long as my knees where in good shape for the final descent.

Last modified on Apr 14, 2015 - 4:19 PM by Slowpoke
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Arno
Arno
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moderator
Apr 14, 2015 - 4:24 PM

@Fognorth: that price is with the 25% discount offered by the Swiss Travel Pass. It's the only exception to the 50% off offered otherwise. A Swiss Half Fare Card or one of the regional passes offer more discounts. But a Swiss Half Fare Card does not include free rides to Wengen like the Swiss Travel Pass, so there's a difference, but not that much.

Anyway, as Annika said, it's the most expensive mountain excursion in Switzerland. There are plenty of other peaks to visit. Jungfraujoch is a special place, but not the only place with stunning views. See here for suggestions. And more tips to save money are listed here.

Fognorth
Fognorth
29 posts
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Apr 15, 2015 - 2:15 PM

Sorry to be such a bother..

Looking at the map it appears that getting to Wengen is covered by the Swiss Travel Pass. I am trying to figure out the map which appears to show that Wengen to Kleine Scheidegg leg is only 25% off since it is part of the route that continues on to the Jungfraujoch? Unclear where the circled 1 applies to? Thanks

Slowpoke
Slowpoke
2656 posts
expert
Apr 15, 2015 - 2:41 PM in reply to Fognorth

<<"Sorry to be such a bother..

Looking at the map it appears that getting to Wengen is covered by the Swiss Travel Pass. I am trying to figure out the map which appears to show that Wengen to Kleine Scheidegg leg is only 25% off since it is part of the route that continues on to the Jungfraujoch? ">>

You are not a bother. Everyone learns a lot from these interchanges, and if it makes your journey simpler or better, that is a good result, and well worth it.

We'd better wait for Arno or Annika to comment, because they are on top of the details.

However, what you say matches my memory.

Here is what I use to remember it. it may be true. ;-)

The logic is that Lauterbrunnen to/from Wengen is intercity public transportation, while the rest of the route - Grindelald, KS, Jungfrau, and KS to Wengen is an excursion line. My guess is that the canton or federal government subsidizes the LB-Wengen line as part of normal social policy.

They perhaps used to be separate rail lines, and may still be that, but I believe that they are all run by the same company, just to make it more complex.

As I say, I'm doing a lot of guessing, but that is how I remember it.

Last modified on Apr 15, 2015 - 2:41 PM by Slowpoke
Arno
Arno
7720 posts
expert &
moderator
Apr 15, 2015 - 2:49 PM

Hi all,

Just to be sure we're looking at the same map: you can find it here: myswissalps.com/ swisstravelpass/ validity

If you zoom into the Wengen area (zoom like 400% or so) you'll see a solid red line to Wengen: that's free. From there a dotted line continues to Kleine Scheidegg, Jungfraujoch and Grindelwald. The circled 1 along those lines is explained in the upper right corner of the document: 25% off. All other dotted lines are 50% off.

The logic behind free versus discounted is like Slowpoke explained: basically all inhabited areas can be reached for free with the Swiss Travel Pass; no tickets required. Remote areas/peaks are considered "attractions" and require a discounted ticket.

Fognorth
Fognorth
29 posts
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Apr 15, 2015 - 3:11 PM in reply to Arno

Yes that is the map I was looking at and at 400% also. Ok, so in the interest of getting to Kleine Scheidegg as inexpensively as possible from Wengen and let's assume I have a Travel Flex Pass Combi. I do not see the Mannlichen(Sp sorry) lift showing? Can you tell me adult cost? And further can a 75 year old in fairly good condition hike the route that sort of follows the train route? Thanks.

Slowpoke
Slowpoke
2656 posts
expert
Apr 15, 2015 - 4:26 PM in reply to Fognorth

<<" Ok, so in the interest of getting to Kleine Scheidegg as inexpensively as possible from Wengen and let's assume I have a Travel Flex Pass Combi. I do not see the Mannlichen(Sp sorry) lift showing? Can you tell me adult cost?">>

I think you are pursuing a good idea.

I cannot find the fares to do the comparison, but it would likely be cheaper to ride the gondola lift from Wengen to Männlichen and walk the 4 km on a really scenic trail to K.S. Wengen to Männlichen lift opens May 30.

That would take you maybe 90 minutes to walk.. Gently downhill. Generally, boots are not needed, just sturdy shoes, but I am more comfortable wearing them.

The stretch of rail from KS to Jungfraujoch is the most expensive part, however, so you might not save as much as you'd like on the total package.

<<"And further can a 75 year old in fairly good condition hike the route that sort of follows the train route? ">>

I've done it in the other direction. It is an 800 meter elevation difference. The trail is generally good. I vaguely remember a few stretches with ruts and rough surfaces. On my Wanderkarte #254T it shows as a regular Wanderweg, not a Mountain Trail, thus boots are not required. You might find that you prefer the ankle support, and definitely should have sturdy shoes with good soles .

When I did that walk, going down, at least 10, maybe 15 years ago, I was generally fit but had not been training with long walks, and by the time I got to Wengen, my knees were quite tired. Stamina was not a problem. You'd not have the knee trouble going up, but you start at 1274 meters above sea level (0.8 miles) and finish at 2061 meters (1.3 miles). if you are not used to hiking at those altitudes, you will likely find it very tiring. It his hard to make judgements for these things based on other peoples physical conditions and experience. Today, at age 76, I would not try it until I had been climbing shorter distances for a few days at those altitudes. And, i would not want to. The Gondola car from Wengen to Männlichen +the trail Männlichen to KS is faster, easier , and much much more scenic.

And, once you are there, you'd probably prefer use your time to do the most spectacular part, and resign yourself to the fact that it is expensive. Once again, to each his own.

Fognorth
Fognorth
29 posts
active member
Apr 15, 2015 - 5:06 PM in reply to Slowpoke

Slowpoke,,,,thanks for input. When I went in 1985 I scoured this whole area for days hiking and of course was much more fit. Took the cog to Jungfraujoch so I have been there done that. I can pass it up this time. Have some family planned with me on this trip and want to get them to the best scenes and think getting to K.S will do that just fine. You say you have been to Switzerland 50 times...really? Wow if so.

Slowpoke
Slowpoke
2656 posts
expert
Apr 15, 2015 - 5:54 PM in reply to Fognorth

<<" You say you have been to Switzerland 50 times...really? Wow if so">>

Starting in 1981 , my job in New York had responsibilities in Geneva. Until i retired at the end of 2002, I had to go to Switzerland on business about 2 to 3 times per year. When possible, I always added a few days of personal time .

Starting in 1989, we began periodic family vacations in Switzerland. Recently, i have been visiting 2 or 3 times per year. Visit friends, go to places I like, find a few new ones.

I guess the number is more like 70 times. Some had no time for sightseeing, however.

When my daughter and 8 year old granddaughter came over in 2009, due to schedule changes and seeking good weather, we drove from Morschach to Lauterbrunen in the morning, rode up to Wengen, then to Männlichen, had lunch in perfect weather, walked to KS, took the train down to Wengen, paused for ice cream on the terrace of the Hotel Silberhorn by the station, continued to Lauterbrunnen, and drove back to Morschahch for a not too late dinner. I would not recommend that, but it was far from impossible. Both of my guests were impressed.

That walk is worth a detour to get to it, IMO.

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