Hiking from Murren to Kandersteg in 4 days

Print this page
Create an account to receive an e-mail when someone replies to this thread
Posts: 11
This thread is closed. You are welcome to log in and submit a new thread.
Addimccarthy
Addimccarthy
2 posts
new member
Sep 25, 2018 - 6:25 PM

I am trying to hike from murren to kandersteg in 4 days and 3 nights. I wanted to do a hut to hut and I found a blog somewhere that said that it is a nice easy 3 day hike, but now that I am studying the maps, the trail to Gspaltenhutte might be a little out of mz league mountaineering wise. I was planning to go from murren to Rotstockhutte, to Gspaltenhornhutte, to bluemlisalphut, but I am reconsidering. I still would like to do a hike, but I am not looking for anzthing very intense or difficult. Has anyone done this particular hike, or know how it is? it is also one of mz first adventures solo, and I am not entirely confident in my navigating skills if the trail disappears or if it isnt clearly marked. If anyone has another short hike starting near the interlaken area also, I am happz to hear it.

Snowman
Snowman
249 posts
active member
Sep 25, 2018 - 9:25 PM in reply to Addimccarthy

Hi Addi, and welcome to MySwissAlps.

Mürren to Rotstockhütte can easily be done in one day (that is, with proper hiking equipment, and the ability to hike 3 hours). Gspaltenhornhütte is not on the way to Kandersteg, and hiking to it is indeed challenging. I have not hiked to Kandersteg but looking at the map that would involve passing at Hohtürli, 2777 m above sea level, I think it's too late for this year.

Once you are at Rotstockhütte, inquire if the Sefinenfurgga pass (2611m) is okay, and, if yes, then hike over it and onwards to Griesalp where there is a hotel and also a bus stop. That I have done, it should not be too difficult, but all depends on the weather and on your own condition and equipment. That trail will not "disappear" (if there is no fog, that is), but I would not do it solo at this time of the year when there might not be so many other hikers to rescue you "in case"...

Lucas
Lucas
9242 posts
expert &
moderator
Sep 26, 2018 - 7:52 AM in reply to Addimccarthy

Hi Addimccarthy,

Yes, are you hiking in 4 days or for 4 days? :) It is indeed getting late for any higher altitude hikes. Snowman has some great advice.
If you haven't seen the Swiss Alpen Club (for hut details) take a look here: www.sac-cas.ch/en.html

Arno
Arno
11270 posts
expert &
moderator
Sep 26, 2018 - 8:42 AM

Hello Addimccarthy,

I haven't done that exact trail. I know that it's definitely nice, but not easy. If you're doing this on your own and you're not confident I'd suggest to start with easier trails, and come back in summer for trails like this if you think you're up for it. Our hiking page has lots of suggestions: www.myswissalps.com/hi king.

Last modified on Sep 26, 2018 - 8:42 AM by Arno
Slowpoke
Slowpoke
5075 posts
expert
Sep 26, 2018 - 1:37 PM in reply to Addimccarthy

Hi Addimccarthy -

www.schweizmobil.ch/en /wanderland/hiking-in-switzerland.html

Use this link and search for Interlaken, Mürren ( not Murren), Kandersteg, etc.

The site has considerable detail on national routes and famous routes such as the Via Alpina:

www.schweizmobil.ch/en /hiking-in-switzerland/routes/nat ional-routes.html

Select "Via Alpina", then follow all the links that show up from "more."

Slowpoke

AlanPrice
AlanPrice
200 posts
active member
Sep 26, 2018 - 11:22 PM

Hi.

I tried to do a solo hike from Grindelwald to kandersteg many years ago, but got stopped by bad weather. The walk from Grindelwald to Murren was straight forward. I took the cablecar from Muerren to Birg to shorten the climb up to the Sefinnenfurge pass. At this point the weather turned and i stayed overnight in the hay loft of a farm. With continuing bad weather i diverted to Griesalp to wait it out, but the weather got worse and it snowed (last week of July ) Plan A had been to hike up to the Bluemlissalphuette, but with bad visibility and 20cm of snow covering the track markers, i walked down to Kiental and caught the bus instead.

In good weather, this hike is doable if you are fit. There are no Technical sections, but it has some long up hill sections and it will be very strenuous if you're not used to that sort of thing. Some of it is over scree, which can be very tiring.

The trail markers are painted on rocks as you go, the ones you should be seeing are red, white, red stripes. There are some sign posts, like one at the Sefinnenfurge, but mostly it will be painted rocks.

One piece of kit that is very handy is a Thommen pocket altimeter. Together with a topographic map, you can navigate better in bad weather than with a compass.

Lastly, it's a good idea to book ahead as these huts are very popular. It's also a good idea so the hut warden will be expecting you, in case something happens.

Have fun!

Alan

Addimccarthy
Addimccarthy
2 posts
new member
Sep 27, 2018 - 4:20 AM in reply to AlanPrice

thank you all!

alanprice

thank you for your input, I’ve actually decided to just hike to griesalp from murren, the same that you did. The only things I’m unsure about (but also not too worried about) is figuring out which trail to get on from Mürren since there’s so many, and also which one from the sefinnenfurge pass. From the sound of it and from what I’ve looked up it should be clearly marked though, at least at the pass.

Slowpoke
Slowpoke
5075 posts
expert
Sep 27, 2018 - 8:22 AM in reply to Addimccarthy

Hi Hi Addimccarthy - -

Here is some information on the trails and markings. Perhaps it is redundant. Not sure which maps you have studied.

You can buy paper maps as well as use the smartphone app, both from Swisstopo.

shop.swisstopo.admin.c h/en/

Paper maps are usually available at sporting goods stores and convenience stores ( Volg, Kiosk, Aperto, etc.) for the nearby regions.

map.geo.admin.ch/?topic=ech&lang=en&bgLa yer=ch.swisstopo.pixel karte-farbe&layers=ch.bav.ha ltestellen-oev,ch.swisstopo.swiss tlm3d-wanderwege&layers_visi bility=false,true&E=26 29782.84&N=1156386.07& zoom=6

www.alpenwild.com/stat icpage/trail-signs-in-the-swiss-alps/

Details about that trail section:

map.schweizmobil.ch/?lang=en&land=wanderlan d&route=1&bgLayer=pk&l ayers=Wanderland&seaso n=summer&resolution=20 &E=2630690&N=1154820

www.schweizmobil.ch/en /hiking-in-switzerland/routes/nat ional-routes/route/etappe-01557.html

images0.schweizmobil.c h/files/wl_1.12.pdf

If you are not used to strenuous physical activity at high altitude, you may find yourself stopping to catch your breath frequently as you climb to the Sefinenfurgge, which will slow you down, and the 1200 meter descent from that high point to Griesalp may leave you with sore knees if your legs are not used to such exercise.

Finally-

Here are your first words:

<<" I still would like to do a hike, but I am not looking for anzthing very intense or difficult.">>

I think that the hike you have chosen will fit in the description of what you wish to avoid, unless, as Alan noted, "In good weather, this hike is doable if you are fit." The weather changes frequently, unpredictably, and on short notice in the high Alps. Be prepared.

Snowman has plenty of Alpine Hiking experience:

<<"That trail will not "disappear" (if there is no fog, that is), but I

would not do it solo at this time of the year when there might not be so

many other hikers to rescue you "in case"..."

>>

Slowpoke

PS-

My name has a "z" in it, and I am used to an English language keyboard. So, when I type on a Swiss keyboard, I get a "y" when I want a "z" when I type my name. And, vice versa. It takes me a few days to sort that out. Seems like you have the same issue. ;-)

Slowpoke

AlanPrice
AlanPrice
200 posts
active member
Sep 27, 2018 - 8:29 AM

Hi,

I would expect all the paths leaving Mürren to be signposted with destinations and walking times. Your first leg is to the Rotstockhütte which should be easy to find (says the man who hasn't actually been to that particular hut - but the Swiss love their signposts). Looking at Google Maps, there is really only 1 path heading west from there and that takes you to the Sefininfurgge where there is a signpost with Griesalp marked on it. Again, looking at Google maps, I see there are wooden steps going down from the pass, which weren't there when I did it, but will make life a lot easier. The path is quite easy to follow and takes you past the farm of Dürrenberg.

I don't know if they still do it, but the family there used to put mattresses down in the hay loft in summer and for a few Francs (probably more these days) you could stay overnight and there'd be soup and bread for supper included. The only drawback were the goats. They stay in the barn underneath and they don't sleep for long and there was always one or more moving around the whole night. How do I know? They were all wearing bells!

In Griesalp I stayed at the Berggasthaus Golderli, which is über quaint and has a fantastic view of the mountains. There are a couple of other Pensions nearby, but I have no experience of them.

www.golderli.ch/home.h tml

As far as maps go, get the green Berner Oberland 1:50000, Blatt (sheet) 5004. This covers all of the area you're interested in and more. If you want more detail, get the brown Mürren 1:25000, Blatt 1248 which covers roughly from Lauterbrunnen to just almost Kandersteg.

You're going to have a blast! This my favourite walk. Colour me Jealous.

Alan

Nevertoolate
Nevertoolate
29 posts
active member
Sep 28, 2018 - 8:33 PM in reply to Addimccarthy

Addimm-- The Muerren-Griesalp leg is to my mind one of the best one day outings in the world (and I recall that Backpacker magazine came to the same conclusion a few years back). I did it this summer as part of a Via Alpina green tour, but did it in reverse (Griesalp to Muerren), which I strongly recommend if you can swing the logistics. That way, the awesome JF/Monch/Eiger sequence hits you all at once like a thunderclap as you crest the Sefinnenfurgge from the West, and then you have that superb view to look directly at all the way down the eastern side into Muerren (as opposed to having it at your back, as would be the case when ascending from the East). You also climb up the western slope in the morning, out of the sun, and then have the sun to your back descending the eastern side in the afternoon. And, the stairs at the top of the western side of the Sfgge are more fun to go up than down.

I also recommend staying at the Golderli Hut outside Griesalp the night before (and ordering the Kaiserschmarrm there).

Viel Spass!

Last modified on Sep 28, 2018 - 8:35 PM by Nevertoolate
Slowpoke
Slowpoke
5075 posts
expert
Sep 28, 2018 - 9:06 PM in reply to Nevertoolate

Hi nevertoolate-

Thanks for jumping in.

I have not gone the hike...wish I could. i waited too long until my knees would no longer permit, but I can certainly agree with your comment about the steps. It's got to be better to go up them than down them.

And, most importantly, the visual impact that you describe is compelling.

Even on a much shorter and easier walk, the way that you approach the Eiger when you walk from Männlichen to Kleine Scheidegg adds immeasurably to the emotional impact of the hike.

And, it's not much fun getting a sore neck from constantly turning around to look over your shoulder. ;-)

Slowpoke

More on MySwissAlps.com

Swiss tips in your mailbox

Sign up to receive our newsletter and the latest forum messages. The best way to prepare for your trip!

Sign up

Get a customized itinerary for your trip

Let Swiss travel consultants create a customized itinerary. They will book your entire trip.

More
© MySwissAlps.com 2002-2018