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My 2 weeks Switzerland visit in July 2022


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Posts: 24 
Danielsan
Danielsan
310 posts
top member
Aug 9, 2022 - 2:46 AM in reply to My Doodles

Hi My Doodles,

I went for two weeks in Sept. 2018. The whole entire time I was there I wore a pair of shorts, and either a tee, or Polo shirt. I had a windbreaker, two sweatshirts, as well as a pair of gloves, a ski hat, a pair of Levi's and a pair of sweat pants, that basically lived in my backpack the whole time, just in case. The most I ever needed was one of the sweatshirts. I bought a pair of Merrell hiking shoes and they never left my feet. I never even thought about what to, or not to wear. I just went...

I stayed 3 nights in Wengen as well. Loved it!! I had dinner one night in the Hotel Bernerhof's restaurant which was very very nice. (Stayed at the Victoria Lauberhorn.) Next night I had dinner on top of Harder Kulm watching the sun go down over the mountains. Beautiful. (The first night I grabbed a bite to eat in Interlaken on my way to Wengen, as I checked into the hotel later in the evening.)

I'd like suggest that perhaps you cut your time in Lucerne and spend a night or two in Zermatt. Again, just a suggestion, and strictly my opinion. In spite of the climate slightly different, its quite beautiful there. (I'm partial to the Matterhorn, as I I was there as a child and some 40-od years I was finally able to get back.) I hope you have a great trip.

To everyone on this wonderful post traveling soon, happy trails. To everyone else, thanks for all your input.

And, thank you all for the absolutely beautiful photos. Memories!!!

Regards,

Danielsan

Mschwalbe
Mschwalbe
58 posts
active member
Aug 9, 2022 - 3:25 AM in reply to AlanPrice

Hi Alan,

Your guess makes sense, however, I was concerned that the Sefinenfurgee might be closed due to snow when I planned the trip many months ago. I didn't want to take the risk of being stuck with a last minute change.

So here is what we did: We stayed in Griesalp (Golderli Gasthaus) one night, hiked up to the Gspalthorn Hut (what a spectacular hike!!), slept there one night; returned back to Griesalp to sleep there once more (we explored different beautiful trails coming down and basically hiked in all day). The next day we took the bus to Reichenback (by the way, it is the steepest Postauto route in Europe - really impressive!) , and then the train back to Lauterbrunnen/ Mürren. From there we hiked up to the Rotstock Hut (which is where we slept), but from Mürren it is not a long walk (although absolutely beautiful!!) and we were there by noon. So from the Rotstock, we hiked up to the top of the Sefinenfurgee (photo of me with my 2 daughters - if you zoom in you will see the signpost showing Sefinenfurgee!). Wow!!! The views are breathtaking!! I had read endless articles/websites about this, and was so happy to do at least half of it!

When one plans all this (from Canada), one is never sure about the distances, time required, etc. Now that I have done it, I would say that we could have gone from the Rotstock hut over the Sefinenfurgee to the Gspalthorn hut. But again, in mid June you never know how much snow there is.

Have you hiked the Sefinenfurgee? Have you hiked some of the trails in the area?

Monica

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AlanPrice
AlanPrice
262 posts
top member
Aug 9, 2022 - 3:47 AM in reply to pkerr

Hi,

Switzerland has an extensive network of huts that cater for people exploring the mountains. Unlike other countries where many huts are situated for hikers doing day trips, or through-hiking to further destinations, a lot of the huts in Switzerland are more for climbers (like the Mitteleggi hut on the ridge leading up to the Eiger) or people doing Hochtouren (High Touring) that requires some level of alpine skill or a guide. That being said, it is possible to visit some stunning places and stay overnight without being a mountain goat.

The largest operator of huts is the Swiss Alpine Club or SAC that owns over 150 huts throughout the country. The huts are operated like hostels - most will have hut wardens during the summer who will cook simple meals for guests and dorm rooms for overnight stays. Some huts, Like the Hoernli Hut on the Matterhorn, are very popular with both climbers who stay overnight for an early start on the mountain, and day hikers who visit to enjoy the views and the close proximity to the Matterhorn. It has a proper restaurant which is supplied by helicopter. Other more remote huts won't have a warden and you will have to take your own food, but there will be cooking and other facilities. The last category would be emergency shelter huts like the Solvay on the Matterhorn that has no facilities, just a couple of bunks and a table. These aren't places you would plan to stay, but they're there in case you are high up in the mountains and get caught in bad weather.

Huts have a few hostel-like rules to abide by. Blankets are provided, but you usually have to provide a sheet of some sort (not always) No boots are allowed inside - slippers are provided. No noise after 2200 especially in huts frequented by climbers who will be up before dawn.

Reservations are always a good idea, especially for the more popular huts. If you need more information, have a look at the SAC site for a complete list of huts and tours.

www.sac-cas.ch/en/

Cheers

Alan

Mschwalbe
Mschwalbe
58 posts
active member
Aug 9, 2022 - 3:54 AM in reply to pkerr

Hi Pkerr,

I discovered a few Swiss Huts a few years ago, and they are absolutely amazing. You hike for endless hours, in the most remote area, and will find a wonderful hut that serves you good healthy food and drink, and that has dormitory type rooms with beds and blankets! No need to carry your own sleeping bag! Only a 'liner' is required.

As far as I understand (somebody could correct me), the huts are obliged to respect certain standard hut 'rules'. For example, I think meals are at fixed times (for example I think supper is always at 18:30). Also, as soon as you enter, you have to remove your boots ; crocs will be available (see photo - so organized, so Swiss !).

Most huts are managed by a 'Hut manager/ hut managers' often a couple. Many huts receive weekly supplies by helicopter. The huts I went to had no showers (I don't imagine that any have showers); electricity to recharge cell phones is limited and could cost some fees. Toilets may be outside of the main building.

I have only been to 3 huts, in 2019 and now in June 2022. I reserved a place to sleep many months prior to arriving.

You might need to plan for lunch on the day you leave the hut (after sleeping there). Well, you can buy a lunch as long as you let them know ahead of time!

I find the 'hut experience' absolutely fascinating!!! Not only the majestic surrounding beauty of the mountains, but the interesting people you meet, the sleeping in a dormitory with total strangers , going to bed early, getting up early, and feeling healthy and on top of the world!!

Monica

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