Taking along hiking poles in planes and trains

Taking along hiking poles in planes and trains

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OHGeologist
OHGeologist
95 posts
active member
Jan 2, 2017 - 1:39 AM

Are hiking poles...collapsible and non..able to be carried on carry ons on planes. ..and are they fine on all rail cars?

Thank you.

Lucas
Lucas
7106 posts
expert &
moderator
Jan 2, 2017 - 9:13 AM in reply to OHGeologist

Hi OHGeologist!

My understanding with hiking/trekking poles is that they are ok for planes only when needed for mobility. However security may decide differently anyway. I've heard stories of airlines saying no problem to customer only for security insisting on it being checked.
They would also need to fit in overhead bins if you get past security.

Trains however are no problem.

Lucas

kim11
kim11
418 posts
top member
Jan 2, 2017 - 7:45 PM

We have never been successful bringing hiking poles on board planes coming from the US. I don't know if flights within Europe have this restriction

The only problem we have encountered with taking hiking poles on trains is forgetting about them and leaving them on board :-) As Lucas suggested, there are no problems and you will encounter many travelers with poles and ruck sacks.

Slowpoke
Slowpoke
4705 posts
expert
Jan 2, 2017 - 10:31 PM in reply to kim11

Hi Kim-

I have some older Leki poles that are short enough to fit in my large duffel bag. I've worn out one in 30 years and am down to one, but it still goes in my checked luggage. I think it is still possible to get ones that collapse short enought to fit in a large duffel bag, but certainly not in a carry on.

As I said to Katie a bit earlier...I like to travel light, but once I take my hiking gear, it is not easy. I am also blessed or cursed with large feet and wear US size 15 Lowas. Good for walking on water, perhaps, but a pair of those goes along way toward filling a carryon. ;-(

By the way, I stopped at the Schönegg in Wengen on the night of the 17th of December. Caroline Ogi was nice, and the staff were very helpful and pleasant, but it was only he second night of the season, and their systems were not working well. Meal service was variable. I ate early. When it got busy, the service became erratic. Food was good. English version of menus did not match German; I needed help with a translation on one description and the English did not say the same thing. I usually need no help. I usually read the German...kein Problem. The operation needed a little fine tuning. I'll try them again in the Spring. They open June 8th.

Slowpoke

kim11
kim11
418 posts
top member
Jan 3, 2017 - 3:19 AM in reply to Slowpoke

Hi Slowpoke,

Yes, poles are no problem in checked baggage. Unfortunately our attachment to our poles is what trips us over into needing to check bags. But with size 15 shoes I suspect you need to check a bag always!

Sorry to hear the meal at the Schönegg wasn't yet up to their usual standard. It seems the first week or two that any restaurant/hotel re-opens there is bound to be some confusion. Re: the English v German menus differing we have found this in nearly every restaurant where we look at both! Many times the English menu does not have all the seclections that the German menu has and sometimes (often?) and the descriptions are different. But the menu at Schönegg is usually so brief that I wouldn't expect that there. Regardless, the "best" are usually those menus that are in German with English "subtitles" but that's not always available.

OHGeologist
OHGeologist
95 posts
active member
Jan 3, 2017 - 6:43 PM

Thank you all. We had ones that collapsed but didn't fit in our "Rick Steve's Carry-on Bags". This year I got new ones that did...but it looks as though we will have to check the "carry-on bags" just due to hiking poles...oh well. It will be worth it. Appreciate all the input.

Balan214
Balan214
17 posts
new member
Jan 3, 2017 - 8:20 PM

Roughly how much would trekking poles be in Switzerland? I never thought about the flight being a problem. I plan on only having carry on so bringing the poles with me may not be an option.

kim11
kim11
418 posts
top member
Jan 3, 2017 - 8:59 PM in reply to Balan214

Typically they range in price from 40 CHF to well over 100 CHF for a set of two.

You can also rent them at any of the Central Sport locations such as Wengen, Mürren, Lauterbrunnen and many others. They start at 9 CHF per day with the daily price decreasing based on the number of days in the rental period. See here for an example: www.centralsport.ch/de /Intersport-Rent/Verleih--Rent-Sommer

Slowpoke
Slowpoke
4705 posts
expert
Jan 4, 2017 - 1:30 AM in reply to OHGeologist

Hi Katie-

Useful information-

<<"This year I got new ones that did...">>

could you tell me the name or model number?

Thanks,

Slowpoke

OHGeologist
OHGeologist
95 posts
active member
Jan 4, 2017 - 11:48 AM in reply to Slowpoke

Hi Slowpoke,

Leki !! Purchased them at REI in store. Broke down into 3 pieces rather than the 2 my old Leki's did...I used them and found them as stable as the old. I just looked on REI's website...Leki Micro Vario Ti Cor-Tec Men's Trekking Poles - Pair. I think I ended up with the men's due to long legs. They were on sale in the store.

Over the last 7 years we have been trying to hit the highest point in each state in the US...and did the eastern ones without poles, then hit New Mexico, Az and Colorado and poles made all the difference in the world.

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