The culture of Röstigraben in Switzerland

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Lucas
Lucas
9609 posts
expert &
moderator
Mar 27, 2018 - 10:54 AM

An interesting topic from the other day on röstigraben in Switzerland.

Interesting to see up to 15% of Swiss never cross this linguistic/culture border!

http://www.bbc.com/tra vel/story/20180325-switzerlands-invisible-linguistic-borders

Chantal
Chantal
944 posts
top member
Mar 27, 2018 - 4:09 PM in reply to Lucas

Nice article Lucas. Oh and tell me about it. When I asked a friend from Geneva to join me for a concert in Bern, his answer was: Bern?! No thank you.

I don't know better than crossing this border every day. That's what I like about Fribourg.

maggiehorswell
maggiehorswell
642 posts
top member
Mar 27, 2018 - 5:03 PM

Hi Lucas and Chantal.

Enjoyed reading this article! Not sure I agree with some of the generalisations though. We got to know a German speaking family in Thun very well when staying in their holiday apartment and they certainly had a great sense of humour! Also on a day trip to Lausanne we didn't find a "laid-back" attitude when we went into a shop and inadvertently spoke German - even when we obligingly switched to French they were what I can only describe as grudging in serving us!

We have stayed in bilingual Biel/Bienne a few times and spent a delightful hour eating supper in a tent at a Christmas market engaging in a trilingual conversation with some friendly locals! Even in a single sentence German, French and English were being used. Great fun!

Maggie

Lucas
Lucas
9609 posts
expert &
moderator
Mar 28, 2018 - 5:13 AM

Switzerland is an interesting country & an interesting culture/people to be sure!

I haven't yet had a chance to visit the French side yet (except a day trip to Montreux and around Col du Pillon) but I am finally getting to Ticino next week for a peek beyond the Polentagraben.

Peterli
Peterli
630 posts
top member
Mar 28, 2018 - 6:46 AM

Hello Lucas, Chantal, and Maggie.

I was expecting to see Slowpoke's two-cent's worth when I saw the word "Röstigraben" in the title of this thread but maybe he'll jump in at some point. I've only got a few minutes right now, but I must say that I agree with Maggie that there are a number of generalisations in the BBC article. On punctuality, I must say that all the Romands that I know are very punctual, as are the trains. And let's not forget that most of the watch-making in Switzerland is done in the Romand area of the country, so accuracy in the measurement and tracking of time is every much in the blood in Neuchâtel as it is in Appenzell. Are Romands more laid back and open to strangers than Swiss-Germans ? Definitely yes. Do Romands know how to really let it all hang out at festivals and public celebrations ? Emphatically yes ! I have to run now, but will leave you with two things. First an article about the evolving Swiss identity from 1964 to 2014, www.swissinfo.ch/eng/s ociety/state-of-the-nation-_the-evolving-swiss-identity--1964-2014/40874250 and second an amusing "Swiss Geography Lesson" from Marie-Thérèse Porchet. https://youtu.be/Pf7b0 1N5P7EThe important thing is that the Swiss can laugh about their differences. There is unity in diversity.

Last modified on Mar 28, 2018 - 6:49 AM by Peterli

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