Train tickets from Italy to Switzerland, how does that work?

Train tickets from Italy to Switzerland, this is how it works

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A Frecciarossa high speed train in the central station of Milan.

Trains from Italy to Switzerland

There are quick direct trains from Milan and some other Italian cities to various Swiss towns. Many high speed trains connect Venice, Rome and other towns to Milan. The eco-friendly and comfortable trains offer a more scenic way to travel than flights. Milan to Zurich only takes 3.5 hours. Rome to Zurich takes less than 7 hours.

How to get the cheapest tickets

  • Book as early as possible. You can book as early as 4 months before traveling. Find prices here;
  • It helps if your travel date and time are flexible. It makes it easier to get the best price;
  • Check if there are promotions;
  • If you have a Swiss rail pass, you only need a ticket to the border. Chiasso (Switzerland), Domodossola (Italy) and Tirano (Italy) are the common border stations. For example: with a Swiss Travel Pass, there is no need for a ticket from Milan to Zurich, because the leg from Chiasso to Zurich is covered by the pass. Just book from Milan to Chiasso;
  • An alternative to booking a ticket to the Swiss border station, is to book a ticket for the "passholder fare". That's a ticket for the entire route for people who own a rail pass for Switzerland or Italy. The ticket is cheaper than a regular ticket because the leg covered by the rail pass is free. An advantage of this fare is that it includes a seat reservation for the entire route, not just to the border. Passholder fares are not always available. If they're unavailable, you simply book to the border;
  • If you have a rail pass that covers both Italy and Switzerland, you don't need a ticket at all. You just need a seat reservation.


Find ticket prices and points of sale.



Check if there are promotions or discounts.



Further tips about tickets and rail passes.



Is something not clear yet? Just post your questions to the Swiss rail forum and get a quick answer.

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